Profile image

Jay Michaelson @Jmm

Trying to find my path in this world of endless opportunities.

Joined Apr 13, 2021
Marketing, development, and project management
Learned web development and marketing at work/home
Timeline
Answered a Question    Aug 3

Being mindful in everyday life can be done by practicing mindfulness in daily activities.
This includes brushing your teeth mindfully, mindful eating, even mindful walking.

The main point is to just be aware of yourself throughout the day, and of your surroundings.
This is not an easy task, and can easily be forgotten and lost from our focus throughout the day. A great way to improve this is to choose daily activities to be mindful during, such as brushing your teeth.

The way you would go about being mindful during these activities is by focusing on what you are doing. If you are brushing your teeth, focus on each tooth being brushed and the motion of your hand and the brush, and how it feels and tastes.
If you are mindful walking, notice how each step vibrates in your body, notice when your heel hits the ground and how that make you feel. Notice the sound your heel makes when it hits the ground. Notice what you are stepping on.

Being mindful in daily tasks and daily activities is a great way to train yourself to be more mindful in everyday life, while reducing the potential for losing focus from mindfulness. This is because instead of just trying to be mindful all day, you are choosing specific times and activities to be mindful during.

You can start with one or just a few activities per day, and slowly you should see that it becomes easier and easier to stay focused and mindful, and you will naturally be able to apply this practice to other tasks and activities.

Read More
Answered a Question    Aug 3

The best smelling essential oil is highly subjective, as it is very much a matter of preference, and what the use of the oil is for.

If the use of the essential oil is topical, you may not want to smell like peppermint and orange when going out, but using a few drops of peppermint oil and orange oil topically is a great way to increase your mood and relieve anxiety.

Some don't really like smelling oils, so they may prefer other, lighter, scented oils.

It really is a matter of how you intend to use the essential oil, what the purpose of the essential oil is, and your preferences in terms of scents.

Read More
Answered a Question    Aug 3

Essential oil blends for anxiety are blends of oils that, when used, promote calmness.
These blends are crafted specifically for the calming effect they have on our bodies and minds, and can consist of multiple different oils, such as Lavender, Lemongrass, Cedarwood, and more.
The specific oil blends for anxiety are crafted for specific intentions, such as increased calmness of the mind, better breathing, calmer energy, mental clarity, and more.

Answered a Question    Aug 2

Meditation and its results are very individual, so it's hard to say how long you have to meditate to see results.

A key guideline to keep in mind though is to not push yourself in the beginning to meditate for longer time periods. Instead, focus on having a consistent meditation practice.

A consistent meditation practice can even consist of just 5-10 minutes of meditation per day. It really doesn't have to be longer than that, especially not in the beginning.
Pushing yourself to meditate for longer can just increase the risk of burning out and stopping the practice completely.

Having a consistent meditation practice that is long-lasting, meaning, one that you will do on a regular basis as a way of life, that is short will bring many more results and have a much bigger impact than doing a few long sessions once in a long while.

Consistency is key here.

Read More
Answered a Question    Aug 2

In simple terms, mindfulness is the ability to be present, or focused, on the current moment. This includes the things happening around you, and within you.

To maybe make it even simpler, it's the ability to be able to not be on autopilot in our day-to-day lives, which most people are on.
Most people just live life and go through their days reacting to the events that occur, but while you are mindful, you are not on autopilot, and you are not just reacting to what happens, you are more prepared to accept what is happening, and are better able to understand it and make better decisions.

When we are on autopilot, many times we just instantly react to what ever happens or to what ever is said. When we are mindful, we let it sink in, we understand it, and then we can better know how to proceed.

It allows us to live a calmer and more peaceful life, with less stress and anxiety, and a better acceptance of ourselves, the people in our lives, and the world around us.

It helps us to not be stuck and focused on the past, or the future, but to be focused on the present moment, on the now.

Read More
Answered a Question    Aug 2

You can lie down to meditate, it is perfectly ok, it just depends on the type of meditation you are doing, and it's purpose.

Meditation lying down for sleep is a great way to prepare yourself to fall asleep, especially if you have trouble relaxing before bed.

If you are debating whether you should meditate lying down or sitting, think about what the purpose of the meditation is, and what you will be doing after.
Many people experience back pain and knee pain when first starting out with meditation, which obviously isn't very relaxing. Of course, this gets better as you keep a consistent meditation practice, but if your purpose is to relax before bed then lying down may be a better option.

Read More
Answered a Question    Aug 2

Mindfulness is not a religion, though it is heavily tied with Buddhism, it is not a religious practice.
Mindfulness is the ability to be fully aware of the present moment. This includes being fully aware of yourself, and your surroundings.
It is a practice that brings your awareness to the present moment, while not being judgmental of any part of it.

Answered a Question    Aug 2

You should definitely not meditate during times when you should be absolutely focused on the task at hand, such as when driving.

While some forms of meditation may be fine to do certain times, others should absolutely not be done (you wouldn't sit crossed legged with eyes closed and meditate while driving, would you?).

Other than the obvious times to not meditate, there are also times when it may be more efficient to not meditate at, such as right before bed. If you experience tiredness to the point where you are having trouble staying awake, and it is interfering with your meditation, then that may just not be a good for you to meditate.
Same for meditation in the morning. If you wake up and meditate right away, but feel that you have not woken up fully, or enough, and are falling asleep during the meditation, then that is probably not the best time for you either.

Other than that, I believe it is up to you to find the best times to meditate at, and the best time to not meditate at. This is very individual and there is no rule that applies to everyone.

Good luck!

Read More
Answered a Question    Aug 1

Back and knee pain while sitting down during meditation is pretty common.
Even amongst people who are physically active, sitting down for long periods of time in a meditation pose can be quite difficult and painful.

Usually this is just a sign that your muscles are not used to the sitting position you are in, especially when sitting for longer periods of time.

People are normally not used to sitting up straight like you would during meditation, so even if someone who is generally physically active sits and meditates, they could also experience some discomfort in their back and knees due to those specific muscles not being used to being in that position.

For the knee and back pain, I find that the more consistent the practice is, the less they hurt. This is because the muscles get used to the sitting position. Though, this does not mean that you should sit for hours, and eventually it will stop hurting.
A consistent practice can also mean a 5-minute session once a day.

With all of that said and while slight discomfort when starting out is quite normal, if it really hurts to sit and meditate to the extent where you cannot continue, and you are suffering, then it may be worth checking it out with a doctor or a specialist, just to make sure nothing is wrong.

As for if improving flexibility can help, from my personal experience, yes, it can. I have also experienced pain in my upper and lower back, and in my knees while meditating. Usually it would start after around 5 minutes. Slowly, after consistently meditating for 10 minutes a day, the pain started to go away, and instead of it starting after 5 minutes, it would start after around 10 minutes, it would just get better and better slowly.
After stretching though, even while sitting for a 15-20 minute session, I wouldn't feel the pain. This isn't just pre-meditation stretching though, I would stretch on a regular basis.

Read More
Answered a Question    Jun 24

Feeling tired during a meditation session is quite common.
One of meditations greatest benefits is its ability to calm us down and put us in a state of tranquility. That fact that you feel tired while meditating may just mean that it's working!

At what time do you meditate?
If you meditate close to bedtime, or right before, as many people do, then it makes sense that you will feel tired. When we go to sleep at the same time, or at a similar hour each night, we are basically training our bodies to understand at what time it should wind down and prepare to fall asleep.

If you choose to meditate around this time, you may just be giving your body extra signals that it needs to get ready to fall asleep. This is because in addition to it already being trained to know that it should be falling asleep soon, you are also giving it all the calming and relaxing signals meditation gives, which may amplify the bodies response and make you even more tired and sleepy.
If possible, try to meditate a little bit sooner so that you are not meditating right before bedtime.

If you meditate right in the morning, shortly after you wake up, and also feel tired, it may just mean that you have not fully woken up yet in order to meditate.
Meditate is a calming exercise, if you wake up in the morning still feeling tired from the night's sleep, and then you engage in a calming and relaxing exercise like meditation, your body may just continue to be sluggish and feel tired, causing you to feel even more tired than you may be after waking up.
If this is the case, try to meditate a little bit later if possible, or, if you are one to drink tea or coffee in the morning (or any other morning drink to wake you up), try meditating after drinking it.

Do you often get tired while sitting down?
There are certain health conditions that cause people to fall asleep and get tired pretty instantly. If you experience tiredness throughout the day while sitting, it may be worth seeing a health expert about this and explaining the situation.

Read More
Answered a Question    Jun 19

A problem many people face when first starting out with meditation is that they find out just how busy and loud their minds are.
It's a common problem that not only beginners face, but also more advanced and experienced meditators.
Those that are more experienced may just know how to better deal with these situations and how to solve them and quiet their minds quicker than those that are just starting out.

One way to quiet your mind and to stop thoughts from coming while you meditate is to first try to understand what those thoughts are, why they are appearing, and to not fight them.
It's when we try to fight the thoughts that the stream of thoughts become uncontrollable, louder, and more intense.

Instead of fighting them and trying to forcefully expel them, leave them alone. See what those thoughts are and where they lead you to. Allow them to be there, present with you in that moment, and when the time is right, calmly release them and let them go.
Though this may take time to get better at, trying to force your mind to be quiet will probably not work and may just result in you not being able to meditate and quiet your mind.

Don't get angry, upset, or irritated at the thoughts. If they are showing up, it may be for a reason. These thoughts may be what is stressing you out, they may be what is causing your depression, anxiety, or other negative thoughts and emotions. Getting angry or upset will do no good. Instead, accept the situation, and allow it to be until you are able to calmly release those thoughts.

If new thoughts appear, that is ok. Repeat the process, allow them to be. Learn from them, see where they take you, and when you are ready, release them.

As you progress, you will be able to do this much easier and quicker, and eventually will be able to start your meditations with a clearer mind, free from the stream of thoughts. It just takes time, like any other practice.
Expecting to start a meditation practice and not have thoughts is a fair way to burn out from practicing at all, since this is just usually not how meditation works.

Throughout our lives, we have allowed our minds to run wild, without control. Being quiet, for most people, is just not something they have trained themselves to do. Meditation and quieting the mind are skills that need to be developed, and for many, they go against who they have been their whole life, as their whole life was spent without controlling their minds and thoughts.

Read More
Answered a Question    Jun 16

There are many forms of meditation. One form is guided meditation.
In a guided meditation, there will usually be an element that guides you through the meditation itself. This could be a person talking and guiding you, it could be a sound, or it could even be both.
Many guided meditations incorporate the element of sound. These sounds could be the sound of rain, rivers, wind, bells, or even music.

Sound is a useful element in meditation due to how easy it is to follow and stay focused on the sound.
This is especially helpful for beginners who are just starting out with meditation and find it difficult to sit and meditate for long and even short periods of time.

Many beginners and even more experienced meditators, incorporate sound and music into their meditations as it allows them to focus better and get into a meditative state faster.

It also helps in situations where it is difficult to find a quiet place. Putting on music or meditative sounds can reduce the background noise that would otherwise bother you, and allow you to follow the sounds and get into a meditative state.

There is no real limit to what sounds can be used. Just as meditation is a different experience for everyone, so can the sounds being used be different from person to person. Some people find it calming to meditate to the sound of a river stream, while others may prefer the sound of the wind blowing through the forest trees.
Other common sounds are calming acoustic instruments, and abstract sounds.

There is also no limit in terms of the origin of these sounds. If you live near a forest, a river, or any form of nature, it can be incredibly calming to have a meditation session in nature. If you do not have that option, then even putting on music or sounds on your phone is a great option.

Read More
Answered a Question    Jun 11

There is no real rule when it comes to meditation and to how long you should meditate for, it's really up to you.

As a general guideline, though, it's strongly recommended to start out small.
Start with short periods of time, such as 5-minute sessions once or twice a day, and build it up slowly.

It may seem like too little, but even 5 minutes a day of being mindful and meditating can have a huge impact on the rest of your day or night, depending on when you decide to do it.

The reason this is strongly advised is because sitting in meditation can be very difficult, much more difficult than many people actually think.

To sit down for a lengthy time period doing nothing but following your breath or listening to a sound can be a very strange sensation, and one that is simply difficult to do.

Starting out with long sessions is a very risky way to start this practice since you can risk losing motivation for the practice once you see that sitting for 30 minutes or longer is difficult.

Start out with short, 5-minute sessions once a day, then add another session when ever you can. Once that gets easy, you will see that you can naturally progress and add more time to each session. Eventually, you will make your way to those 20-30 minute sessions.
Progressing slowly helps ensure that you do not lose motivation for the practice, and that you don't stress yourself out about not being able to meditate for long periods of time.

Read More
Answered a Question    Apr 27

There is a saying I try to live by: Don't do to others what you wouldn't want done to you.

And this is what frustrates me and upsets me, that others who also try and live by that saying or at least agree with it, do the complete opposite.
Not saying that mistakes don't and won't happen, they do and they will, we are not perfect, and that is part of what is beautiful about us humans.

But, when people purposefully do things to others, that they themselves know they would not want done to them, but consciously make the decision to do those things anyway, that is what gets to me, that is what upsets me.

Read More
Answered a Question    Apr 27

I think much of the youth are much more intellegent than they get credit for. I believe many of them could make a great change.

But, of course, its very difficult to say since there is such a great diversity in the mindset of the younger population.

Answered a Question    Apr 27

This is actually a difficult question to answer, as both can lead to great experiences, even though they may seem like major negative things.

Having too much money and relying on that money can keep you in a very comfortable and safe zone, limiting the adventures and excitement in life.

Being alone allows you to better understand yourself, and to appreciate your own company, rather than relying on others.

People tend to rely on money and on other people to help them feel happiness, believing that those two are conditions to living a full and happy life.

Being alone or lonely isnt always a negative, being broke can cause you to go down new paths you may not have thought of if you had more money.

But, of course, its all a matter of perspective and how each of us define broke and lonely.

Read More
Answered a Question    Apr 27

Freedom.
This is a much bigger concept than the word implies though.

It means being able to have the freedom to be who you want to be, to be where you want to be and do what you want to do, all with the crucial rule of respecting others in the process.

The more you break this rule and show disrespect, the more freedom you lose.

Respecting people includes not preventing them from having their own freedom, and not hurting them or harming them in any way, physically or verbally.

Respecting is not limited to people though, it also means respecting animals and the planet.

Read More
Answered a Question    Apr 11

Going on hikes in nature alone. This is my go-to relaxation exercise for when I am really stressed or I am facing tough decisions and tough times in general.

I may be alone, but, I wouldn't really want it any other way during those times. Being alone allows me to not have to focus on other people. It really allows me to not focus on anything at all. I can just keep on walking without focusing on anything specific. This allows my mind to calm down and relax, which then allows me to start thinking in a much clearer way, without the impulsive thoughts and emotions that I may have due to what ever the situation is in my life.

Read More
Answered a Question    Apr 11

Adventure and a sense of freedom

Answered a Question    Apr 10

The people i meet along the way.
Life is a long journey, ill meet many very important people.

Load More
spacer
spacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacer
spacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspc
spacerspacerspacerspacer
Profile image
spacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer

spacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacerspacerspacerspacer
spacerspacerspacer
spacerspacer
Profile image
spacerspacerspacer
spacer
Profile image
spacerspacerspacer
spacer
Profile image
spacerspacerspacer
spacer
Profile image
spacerspacerspacer
spacer
Profile image
spacerspacerspacer
spacer
Profile image
spacerspacerspacer
spacer
Profile image
spacerspacerspacer
spacer
Looks like there is missing information!
Something went wrong, a report has been sent to us to check what happened.
Looks like there was an issue